Institute for Environmental Toxicology

Western Washington University Professor of Environmental Science Wayne Landis, director of the university’s Institute for Environmental Toxicology, has secured a $320,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to help scientists better understand the threat posed by plastics to aquatic life…

Oregon State University researchers will use a $3.3 million grant from the National Science Foundation to study tiny plastics and their potential impacts on aquatic life.

Western Washington University will use a separate NSF grant to contribute to the project, Harper said. Wayne Landis,…

Some researchers say the extent of possible changes to health risks based on the water quality standard adjustments are difficult to pin down.  

"Anytime a regulation is changed, there's actually a calculation that's supposed to be done. There are often assumptions made in…

When WWU Professor of Environmental Science and Director of the Institute of Environmental Toxicology Wayne Landis isn't teaching, working to unravel the ethical boundaries of genetic testing, or helping state agencies understand the impacts of industrial toxins, there's a good chance he is in…

Western Washington University's Window Magazine came away from the last Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) Region XIII conference with a trio of awards. The Window creative team - editor Mary Gallagher, graphic designer Chris Baker…

Karl Kruger stepped onto his paddleboard and began to paddle to Alaska. It was the start of the journey, but also the culmination of a lifetime of outdoor experience that made him ideally suited for the wild adventure.

Just 15 days later, after covering 766 miles, Kruger stepped off his…

Picture the African continent without its 214 million annual cases of malaria. Or South America devoid of the scourge of the new terror of the Zika virus. Or developing nations in the tropics not spending hard-won resources fighting dengue fever, an illness so painful that it’s also known as “…

Virginia’s South River flows along the western foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains, coiling its way across bucolic rolling farmlands and through small towns, marching north to join first the Shenandoah and then the Potomac before eventually emptying into the Chesapeake Bay.

With its…

Pacific herring might be the most popular dish in Puget Sound. The small silvery swimmers are called “forage fish” not because they’re rummaging for food, but because just about everything wants to eat them.

They fill the bellies of Puget Sound sea life, from giant…

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