Faculty Research

Communication is a two-way street; when one speaks, the other listens, and tries to interpret the sometimes subtle signals in the language.

But when you’re a geophysicist, and what you’re listening to are the not-so-subtle signals of one of the most active fault systems in the world –…

In June 1969, Cleveland's Cuyahoga River, polluted with oil and chemicals from the city's steel mills, caught fire, and the images of city fire crews fighting a river so fouled with pollution that it could actually catch fire set in motion what would become in 1972 the Clean Water Act, federal…

After a year delay due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the Molecular Biosciences Symposium is back! WWU Associate Professor of Chemistry Jeanine Amacher developed the symposium in 2019 in order to bring together Western students and faculty with other academics (faculty, doctoral students, and…

High prenatal growth rates found in modern people may have first evolved in ancient hominids less than a million years ago, according to estimates based on fossil teeth.

Human fetuses grow by around 11.6 grams per day on average – considerably faster than the fetuses of gorillas, the…

The plentiful seaweed off the shores of Fidalgo and other surrounding islands has concentrated contaminants, according to a study published recently by a team at Western Washington University.

It's the same seaweed that is often eaten by area tribal members and kayakers looking for a…

The toxicity levels of seaweed at two Skagit County sites were included in a Salish Sea study done by Western Washington University researchers

The study, published in the scientific journal PLoS One on Sept. 23, looked at three species of edible seaweed at 43 Salish…

From the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs 

Refer to the RSP website for additional information, proposal guidelines, and application forms. 

 

The deadlines listed below are for the dates that applications (eSign forms) with attached proposal materials are due to RSP (…

A new study just published by researchers at Western Washington University (WWU) reports concentrations of up to 162 chemical contaminants in three species of edible seaweeds gathered in the Salish Sea.

Seaweeds are consumed by many people living on or near the Salish Sea – from Indigenous peoples revitalizing the ancient foodways of their cultures to those simply seeking a readily available and highly nutritious protein source - but little is known about whether contaminants in the Sea’s…

It takes a butter clam about three years to grow to harvestable size, according to Western Washington University marine ecologist and Samish Nation member Marco Hatch.

“What we're doing here is something that hasn't been done in living memory, which is build a clam…

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