John Rybczyk

Western’s faculty and students are engaged in exciting research and scholarship across a variety of fields. Each week, Western Today will share short summaries of the latest developments in scholarly work at the University. Interested in reading in-depth stories about science and research at…

Wetland monitoring reports have been  professionally prepared and submitted by Perry at Welch Ecological Services LLC.  This year, which is monitoring project Year Three, Recreation Northwest was fortunate to engage students from Western Washington University to collect and summarize…

Wetland monitoring reports have been  professionally prepared and submitted by Perry at Welch Ecological Services LLC.  This year, which is monitoring project Year Three, Recreation Northwest was fortunate to engage students from Western Washington University to collect and summarize…

Bellingham residents were given a rare treat on Tuesday when Transient orca pod T46B spent most of the day in Bellingham Bay, much to the delight of hundreds of onlookers from shore and a few lucky kayakers.

But not only were onlookers treated to a view of the pod, they also got an…

While the treatment plant on the Skagit is standing its ground, that approach won’t work everywhere.

One river to the south, Katrina Poppe and John Rybczyk sledge-hammered a white, meter-long tube of plastic into the mud.

Rybczyk sported mud boots and shorts;…

A new study out of Western Washington University found restored wetlands stored a significant amount of carbon from the atmosphere, showing promise in the efforts to mitigate climate change.

Dr. John Rybczyk and his research assistant Katrina Poppe compared the rate of carbon being…

In the first of a two-part Q&A, WWU's Doug Clark (Geology) and John Rybczyk (Environmental Science) talk about their research and how their fieldwork is increasingly tied to some aspect of climate change. Clark, a glacial geologist, witnesses firsthand the world's shrinking glaciers (…

wo recent studies by researchers at Western Washington University evaluated the carbon content in eelgrass meadows in Skagit County.

All of this information must be plugged into models to project how wetlands will evolve in the coming decades—and whether they will be able to keep pace with rapidly rising seas, says John Rybczyk, a wetlands ecologist at Western Washington University in Bellingham. His analysis…

Understanding how much carbon enters the atmosphere when a wetland is drained for agriculture or other purposes requires a more detailed understanding of the soil make-up. 

All of this information must be plugged into models to project how wetlands will evolve in the coming decades…

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