George Mustoe

The aptly named Rock Trail weaves between towering sandstone walls and truck-sized boulders before descending toward Lost Lake. And if you’ve hiked here through all seasons and explored every nook and cranny as Bellingham geologist George Mustoe has, you would notice one compelling detail:&#…

This past Saturday, a private collector paid $10,370 at auction for what was touted as a six-million-year-old turd. Billed in the auction house catalog as fossil feces measuring "an eye-watering 40 inches in length" and believed to be "possibly the longest example of coprolite…

A natural history exhibit in an unlikely location offers a glimpse at Western Washington's geologic past.

It's another of those "hidden Bellingham" places that never cease to enthrall us: In the hallways of the Environmental Studies building at Western Washington…

A team of researchers from Washington, US, examined tracks uncovered in a landslide in 2009.

Previous investigations have suggested the giant bird was a carnivorous predator or scavenger.

But the absence of raptor-like claws in the footprints supports the theory that Diatryma was…

The reign of the dinosaurs came to a catastrophic end 66 million years ago. That’s the common trope, anyway – a holdover from before we recognized that at least one feathery lineage survived and proliferated after the K/Pg devastation. We still live in the Age of Dinosaurs – a 230 million year…

For more than 30 years, the men and horses of the Bellingham Coal Mines toiled beneath the city, using dynamite and muscle power to carve a labyrinth of passageways through a thick coal seam. Over their heads was a ceiling of crumbly slate rock, held up— if all went well— by log timbers and…

The university’s Geology Department has an extensive display of fossils, rocks and minerals. Developed in the 1980s by geology research technician George Mustoe, the collection now lines the hallways of the buildings’ first three floors.

While some of the items are in display cases,…

Fifty million years ago, when what is now Washington state was covered with a verdant subtropical rainforest, a 380-pound flightless bird called Diatryma stalked the floodplains of the region’s meandering rivers.

At 10:24 a.m. Monday, July 12, in the foothills northeast of Deming, the heavy-duty helicopter gently lowered a sandstone slab onto a flatbed truck on loan from Western Washington University.

A safe distance away in the foothills drizzle, several members of WWU's geology department…

Fifty million years ago, when what is now Washington state was covered with a verdant subtropical rainforest, a 380-pound flightless bird called Diatryma stalked the floodplains of the region’s meandering rivers.

Although Diatryma was long thought to have existed in this region, a…

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