Edward Vajda

April 26, 2011, marks the 25th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear disaster. Edward Vajda, a professor in Western Washington University's Center for International Studies, worked as a translator and news analyst in the Moscow office of CBS News during the crisis. In a presentation…

Edward Vajda, director of Western Washington University’s Center for East Asian Studies, will present “The Russian Fairy Tale: Ancient Culture in a Modern Context” at noon on Tuesday, Feb. 1, in College Hall 131 on the WWU campus.

The event is free and open to the…

Sealaska Heritage Institute will sponsor a noon lecture series, dance performances, and a Native art market to celebrate Native American Heritage Month in November.

The brown-bag lunch series will focus on topics such as Tlingits and combat and Native history and…

An obscure language in Siberia has similarities to languages in North America, which might reshape history, writes Randy Boswell.

A new book by leading linguists has bolstered a controversial theory that the language of Canada's Dene Nation is rooted in an ancient Asian tongue spoken…

A new book is presenting more evidence that a Bering Strait land bridge once connected North America with Asia.

The book includes an article by Western Washington University linguistics professor Edward Vajda on his work with the isolated Ket people of Central Siberia.

A new book by a leading group of linguists has bolstered a controversial theory that the language of Canada's Dene Nation — along with those of the Navaho and Apache in the U.S., and numerous other "Athapaskan" dialects — is rooted in an ancient and highly endangered Asian tongue…

Research illuminating an ancient language connection between Asia and North America supports archaeological and genetic evidence that a Bering Strait land bridge once connected North America with Asia, and the discovery is being endorsed by a growing list of scholars in the field of linguistics…

A team of researchers, including several at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, have found what looks to be the first well-supported demonstration of an ancient language connection between people in remote Asia and North America.

When the ancestors of today’s Native Americans first crossed the Bering Sea land bridge to North America thousands of years ago, they brought a root dialect that formed the basis of more than 45 languages to follow in the years to come, according to a new book by Western Washington…

This afternoon in Humanities Building Room 103, Western Washington University Professor Ed Vajda will teach what he thinks is the second-largest Mongolian-language class in the history of U.S. higher education.

The biggest class ever, he thinks, was the one he taught last quarter. These…

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