WWU's Huxley College of the Environment to Host Rich Bowers April 27

Thursday, April 26, 2012 - 12:30pm

 

Contact: Western Washington University’s Huxley College of the Environment at (360) 650-3520
 
BELLINGHAM – Rich Bowers, the Pacific Northwest coordinator for the Hydropower Reform Coalition, will present "Protecting and Restoring Rivers by Changing How They Are Harnessed for Energy" as part of Western Washington University’s Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series at noon on Friday, April 27 in Room 304 of the Academic Instructional Center West building on the Western campus. 
The presentation is free and open to the public. 
The Hydropower Reform Coalition (www.hydroreform.org) is a national consortium of more than 150 outdoor recreation and conservation organizations that have effectively reduced impacts of hydropower dams on rivers. Founded in 1992, the Coalition now has a combined membership of over one million people. They represent diverse stakeholders, from canoeists to conservationists to lake homeowners. Their joint efforts have protected or restored thousands of river kilometers, thousands of hectares of watershed land, and countless opportunities for boating, fishing, and other forms of recreation. Members can - at no cost - draw on this vast reservoir of collective knowledge and experience to improve conditions on dammed rivers in their own backyards. 
Bowers provides regional and national communication to more than 36 members in the Northwest, as well as industry, agency and tribal partners regarding individual project licensing, and hydropower strategy, training and policy. Previously, Bowers led the national nonprofit organization American Whitewater, as Executive Director and as Conservation and Hydropower Program Director. He is a founding steering committee member for both the Hydropower Reform Coalition and the California Hydropower Reform Coalition. Bowers has been a nonprofit consultant, board member and a volunteer river advocate for many issues since moving to Bellingham from Maryland in 2001. Bowers is currently a board member for both American Whitewater and the Whatcom Land Trust. 
Anyone interested in this topic is encouraged to come and participate. The presentation will include a question-and-answer period. The speaker series is held by Western's Huxley College of the Environment to bring together the environmentally minded community and other interested members of the WWU and Bellingham communities. Speakers address topics of contemporary environmental concern in the region and the world. 
Western’s Huxley College of the Environment is one of the oldest environmental colleges in the nation and a recognized national leader in producing the next generation of environmental stewards. The College’s academic programs reflect a broad view of the physical, biological, social and cultural world. This innovative and interdisciplinary approach makes Huxley unique. The College has earned international recognition for the quality of its programs.
For more information, please contact the main office of Huxley College of the Environment, at (360) 650-3520. 
 

 

Contact: Western Washington University’s Huxley College of the Environment at (360) 650-3520

BELLINGHAM – Rich Bowers, the Pacific Northwest coordinator for the Hydropower Reform Coalition, will present "Protecting and Restoring Rivers by Changing How They Are Harnessed for Energy" as part of Western Washington University’s Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series at noon on Friday, April 27 in Room 304 of the Academic Instructional Center West building on the Western campus. 

The presentation is free and open to the public. 

The Hydropower Reform Coalition (www.hydroreform.org) is a national consortium of more than 150 outdoor recreation and conservation organizations that have effectively reduced impacts of hydropower dams on rivers. Founded in 1992, the Coalition now has a combined membership of over one million people. They represent diverse stakeholders, from canoeists to conservationists to lake homeowners. Their joint efforts have protected or restored thousands of river kilometers, thousands of hectares of watershed land, and countless opportunities for boating, fishing, and other forms of recreation. Members can - at no cost - draw on this vast reservoir of collective knowledge and experience to improve conditions on dammed rivers in their own backyards. 

Bowers provides regional and national communication to more than 36 members in the Northwest, as well as industry, agency and tribal partners regarding individual project licensing, and hydropower strategy, training and policy. Previously, Bowers led the national nonprofit organization American Whitewater, as Executive Director and as Conservation and Hydropower Program Director. He is a founding steering committee member for both the Hydropower Reform Coalition and the California Hydropower Reform Coalition. Bowers has been a nonprofit consultant, board member and a volunteer river advocate for many issues since moving to Bellingham from Maryland in 2001. Bowers is currently a board member for both American Whitewater and the Whatcom Land Trust. 

Anyone interested in this topic is encouraged to come and participate. The presentation will include a question-and-answer period. The speaker series is held by Western's Huxley College of the Environment to bring together the environmentally minded community and other interested members of the WWU and Bellingham communities. Speakers address topics of contemporary environmental concern in the region and the world. 

Western’s Huxley College of the Environment is one of the oldest environmental colleges in the nation and a recognized national leader in producing the next generation of environmental stewards. The College’s academic programs reflect a broad view of the physical, biological, social and cultural world. This innovative and interdisciplinary approach makes Huxley unique. The College has earned international recognition for the quality of its programs.

For more information, please contact the main office of Huxley College of the Environment, at (360) 650-3520.